In the Neighborhood of True

In the Neighborhood of True

By:  Carlton, Susan Kaplan

9781616208608
$25.95 Hardback
Available
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Available
2019/04/09
Algonquin Books

Limited ***

5.5 X 8.3 in
320 pg



YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Social Themes / Prejudice & Racism
YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Romance / Historical
YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Historical / United States / 20th Century
New York transplant Ruth Robb hides her Jewish identity to fit into the segregated Atlanta of the 1950s, until a hate crime forces her to come to face the whole truth about the choices she’s made, the boy she might love, and the true cost of living only in the neighborhood of true. Inspired by a real-life event.

“Carlton captures the racism, anti-Semitism, and social interactions of the time and place with admirable nuance. The dialogue and setting are meticulously constructed, and readers will feel the humidity and tension rising with each chapter.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Susan Kaplan Carlton offers a rich sense of time and place and a compelling profile in courage of a conflicted 17-year-old finding her voice in this interesting snapshot of a little-known chapter of the early civil rights movement.”
The Buffalo News

“Every character is memorable and complex, and the plot quickly becomes engrossing . . . the characters' moral decisions are so complicated and so surprising that many people will be kept spellbound by even the tiniest detail. Riveting.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Carlton does an excellent job of mixing the personal with the historical . . . Ruth crisply relays her conflicted feelings, the tense situations, and characters who are well-shaded and occasionally surprising.”
Booklist

In the Neighborhood of True, inspired by real-life events, is a testament to an important time in our country's history with themes that resonate today.”
Shelf Awareness

“Inspired by the 1958 bombing of an Atlanta synagogue, this novel uses its immersive historical setting to convey truths about hatred that remain relevant today . . . Timely YA historical fiction that belongs on all shelves.”
School Library Journal

“A gorgeous story about a teenage girl finding her voice in the face of hate, heartbreak, and injustice.”
Nova Ren Suma, #1 New York Times bestselling author of A Room Away from the Wolves
 
“Susan Kaplan Carlton’s snapshot of 1958 Atlanta is both exquisite and harrowing, and I will hold it in my heart for a long time.”
Rachel Lynn Solomon, author of You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone and Our Year of Maybe

“You might not think a book set in 1959 could feel wildly relevant, but wow does this YA set in Atlanta that explores anti-Semitism in the south during the Civil Rights era feel incredibly on point after the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. In both cases, the synagogue was specifically targeted for being not just a place of worship for Jews but for being active participants in the eternal American fight against racism.”
Barnes & Noble Teen Blog
 
“One of the most honest, multifaceted, and authentic portrayals of teen girlhood I've ever read. This is a must for readers of historical fiction, particularly areas that receive less attention.”
Young Adult Books Central
 
“I loved this book. The characters are complex and relatable . . . Carlton captures the emotions and the struggle perfectly, making it a great place to find representation of what it’s like to be Jewish then and now.”
Teenreads
 
In the Neighborhood of True is a story that really struck a chord with me. It highlights issues that remain as relevant then as they are now. It reminded us that we can’t truly hide ourselves, not when it matters the most. Most important of all, it reminds the reader that we must always tell our truths, no matter how hard it might be for others to hear them.”
The Nerd Daily
 


Susan Kaplan Carlton currently teaches writing at Boston University. The author of Love & Haight and Lobsterland, her writing has also appeared in Self, Elle, Mademoiselle, and Seventeen. She lived for a time with her family in Atlanta, where her daughters learned the finer points of etiquette from a little pink book and the power of social justice from their synagogue.