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Elk Whistle Warrior Society

Elk Whistle Warrior Society
Rick Revelle By (author)
9781990326035
$18.95
Paperback
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Available
2023/02/03
Crossfield Publishing

Limited ***

5.5 X 8.5 in
248 pg


YOUNG ADULT FICTION / People & Places / Aboriginal & Indigenous
FICTION / Action & Adventure
FICTION / Native American & Aboriginal

Description

The Elk Whistle Warrior Society is a novel about Indigenous women taking back their place on Turtle Island and protecting the vulnerable.
In the past, the men were responsible for providing the necessities of life, food, shelter and clothing.
Pre—contact Native women in all communities were decision makers, life—givers and caretakers of life. Colonization brought patriarchy and racism attacking women's identities.
In Haudenosaunee society clan mothers appointed the chiefs and made other important decisions representing the will of the people.
Blackfoot women owned their own homes and were subservient to no one. Equal in all ways.
Indigenous women of numerous Native societies had rights and integrity, way before the arrival of Europeans. They had complete control of their lives and were free from gender violence.
Pre—contact women and children were the treasures of Native society. Without them communities could not grow. Warriors would protect them with their lives.
The taking of Native children and putting them in residential schools destroyed the future of this society for generations to follow.
The Elk Whistle Warrior Society is all about saving their children, daughters, mothers, aunties and grandmothers from the people who prey on them and only sees themas an economic commodity in human trafficking.
The Society, using the Native way of doing things, hunts down the people who murder their relatives.
In the Elk Whistle Warrior Society there is no hierarchy. Equality is the norm. Everyone is interchangeable in their roles and ranking doesn't exist. The Native circle is their way of doing the job, all equal within the circle.
There is a group called the Guardians who supply them with everything they need to function. These are the Ancients, Elders who have been in the Society for years. The male warriors back up the women.
The reader will find that there are many characters who appear in cities where the society members are doing their work. There is not one group that travels around from city to city. Each area has four or five warriors that can be called on when needed, with certain people travelling in to help.
No one in the Society has a title of leader, logistics experts, forensic scientists, trackers, etc. They all can do everything. These women and men are well educated and trained.
No one questions how the safe houses handle the techie stuff, the warriors know that the computer hackers can do their jobs it because all the warriors are trained in that aspect when needed.
In the tradition of the two great Indigenous women. Lozen, the Apache woman warrior of the Chiricahua Apache's and the sister of Victorio, who Geronimo said she was his best horse stealer and warrior; plus Running Eagle, the woman warrior of the Piikáni Piegan Tribe of the Blackfeet Nation, The Elk Whistle Society carries on the tradition of all these brave women, plus all the others, from their ancestor's before them.


Author Bio

Rick was born in Smith Falls, Ontario and belongs to the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation. His early years were spent in Wilton and Odessa Ontario. He lived for 32 years in Glenburnie, Ontario, and since 2019 in Napanee. He has written four previous books, I Am Algonquin (2013), Algonquin Spring (2015), Algonquin Sunset (2017),published by Dundurn Press. Crossfield Publishing, of St Marys, Ontario, published the final novel of the series, Algonquin Legacy. His readers are introduced to the Algonquin, Anishinaabe, Lakota, Mi´kmaq, Mohawk, and Lak?óta, languages as they are used in the vernacular in the four novels.
Rick's books are read in Native Studies classes across Canada, and he is much in demand as an interpreter for museums and schools.